Gutman Assif Architects

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  • A New Campus For Bezalel Academy of Art and Design Competition

A New Campus For Bezalel Academy of Art and Design Competition

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A New Campus For Bezalel Academy of Art and Design Competition

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Jerusalem

Client: Bezalel Academy
Location: Jerusalem
Area: 25.000 Sq.m.
Year: 2008
 

This competition for a New Building for the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design introduces is a rare opportunity for a unique interrelation between Jerusalem's city life and the vitality of the Academy, its staff and students. To face the challenges presented by these urban, cultural and paradigmatic developments, our proposal suggests creating an urban campus that can absorb information from its surroundings, while projecting outwards the inner-workings of the Academy.

Urban Context and Connection

The public space system in and around the project derive of three relationships on site: the contiguity of the Academy to the Holy Trinity Cathedral, the connection between the two new volumes, and the unique views that the site overlooks. These in turn have given form to three types of public spaces, given further definition by the level differences on site and all the while respecting its classic 19th Century urbanism, scale and materiality: an

intimate plaza shared with the Cathedral, an open platform between the two volumes, and landscaped steps looking out across the views.

Core System

The project pivots around a three-dimensional core system beginning beneath ground level where it connects the two volumes, and rising as vertical atriums from which the main defining spaces of the Academy branch out, including the common functions of the school, exhibition, meeting and public spaces. The main entrances to the project from the city lead directly into the cores, and as such, into the heart of the Academy, where the space opens and the view extended to the central circulation system and to the main public functions, to events and exhibitions.

The core system creates a series of visual connections as well as functional. With its branches open to the exterior views, the interior is joined with the site context to take in the breathtaking panoramas and natural light changes throughout the day. Furthermore, the core system creates a stream of visual connections throughout the Academy crossing through parts of each building, between the two buildings, and their surroundings, and opening views into the Academy from the city. Bezalel Academy is therefore not merely located in the city, but is an active and dynamic part of it.

Program

The program is distributed between the two buildings according to those departments with and without special requirements. The buildings are connected through a horizontal base, while the top floors are allocated to common use classrooms and laboratories. Departments are organized horizontally to facilitate everyday use by students, teachers and staff, while each floor is designed as a free plan to allow for future modifications and re-organization with changing needs

Form and Facade

The form of the building is derived from the core system, where the facade bends to meet with and open to the various branches. By way of keeping with its context, the buildings' facades are clad with traditional Jerusalem Stone in its familiar modulation, and is given a degree of lightness and a contemporary feel by hanging the stones in a unique manner. This creates a translucent skin of sorts, diffusing a soft light into the scaled – down department windows. This also allows the stone-clad buildings the appearance by night of two light boxes on one of Jerusalem's prominent heights. "

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Jerusalem

Client: Bezalel Academy
Location: Jerusalem
Area: 25.000 Sq.m.
Year: 2008
 

This competition for a New Building for the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design introduces is a rare opportunity for a unique interrelation between Jerusalem's city life and the vitality of the Academy, its staff and students. To face the challenges presented by these urban, cultural and paradigmatic developments, our proposal suggests creating an urban campus that can absorb information from its surroundings, while projecting outwards the inner-workings of the Academy.

Urban Context and Connection

The public space system in and around the project derive of three relationships on site: the contiguity of the Academy to the Holy Trinity Cathedral, the connection between the two new volumes, and the unique views that the site overlooks. These in turn have given form to three types of public spaces, given further definition by the level differences on site and all the while respecting its classic 19th Century urbanism, scale and materiality: an

intimate plaza shared with the Cathedral, an open platform between the two volumes, and landscaped steps looking out across the views.

Core System

The project pivots around a three-dimensional core system beginning beneath ground level where it connects the two volumes, and rising as vertical atriums from which the main defining spaces of the Academy branch out, including the common functions of the school, exhibition, meeting and public spaces. The main entrances to the project from the city lead directly into the cores, and as such, into the heart of the Academy, where the space opens and the view extended to the central circulation system and to the main public functions, to events and exhibitions.

The core system creates a series of visual connections as well as functional. With its branches open to the exterior views, the interior is joined with the site context to take in the breathtaking panoramas and natural light changes throughout the day. Furthermore, the core system creates a stream of visual connections throughout the Academy crossing through parts of each building, between the two buildings, and their surroundings, and opening views into the Academy from the city. Bezalel Academy is therefore not merely located in the city, but is an active and dynamic part of it.

Program

The program is distributed between the two buildings according to those departments with and without special requirements. The buildings are connected through a horizontal base, while the top floors are allocated to common use classrooms and laboratories. Departments are organized horizontally to facilitate everyday use by students, teachers and staff, while each floor is designed as a free plan to allow for future modifications and re-organization with changing needs

Form and Facade

The form of the building is derived from the core system, where the facade bends to meet with and open to the various branches. By way of keeping with its context, the buildings' facades are clad with traditional Jerusalem Stone in its familiar modulation, and is given a degree of lightness and a contemporary feel by hanging the stones in a unique manner. This creates a translucent skin of sorts, diffusing a soft light into the scaled – down department windows. This also allows the stone-clad buildings the appearance by night of two light boxes on one of Jerusalem's prominent heights. "