Gutman Assif Architects

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  • A New Building for Tel Aviv Museum

A New Building for Tel Aviv Museum

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A New Building for Tel Aviv Museum

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Tel Aviv, Jaffa

Client: Tel Aviv Museum
Location: Tel Aviv, Jaffa
Area: 20.000 Sq.m.
Year: 2003
 

We see this project as an opportunity to act as catalyst to enhance the cultural complex where the new building for the Museum of Tel Aviv will be located. We recognise the value of the museum not just as an exhibition/presentation area, but rather an infrastructure to support the production and transmission of knowledge, and to maintain culture and education as ongoing, dialogical activities.

To allow this and to satisfy the brief's requirements concerning phases and areas, the building is organised through a vertical sedimentation of programs and structures.

The exhibition areas form a roof over a collective space – the lobby – articulating the three existing open spaces surrounding it – giving access to the existing Museum, the Opera square and the elevated garden – while the auditorium, storage and part of the educational program, support and configure

the basement for the whole complex. The more public components of the educational program become portions of this collective space and begin a gradual transition from the public spaces, through the education, to the exhibition areas. We propose a floating box that hosts all of the upper programs – a machine to control the entry of light is formed by several devices that carry out different roles along it's distribution. The first device is a skin composed of strips, reacting to the different programs and when necessary, transmitting light and views to various parts of the building. A second main device is the roof that lights the upper hall galleries from above (with Northern light), altered according to the need of the different exhibitions. A third element is a series of diagonals: the entire upper part of the building is supported by a structure that consists of a series of vierandel – like beams. These free the exhibition halls of columns and host all the circulation and light entrances (with continuous views towards the public park to the West and to the existing Museum Square to East). They span over the collective space with minimal supports.

The diagonal layout of the structure allows us to optimise the spaces negotiating the external triangular shape of the plot with the internal requirements of the exhibition halls. These diagonals concentrate all of the programs that support the exhibition areas and the library, and have the characteristic of being mainly translucent. They allow a controlled transparency from inside during the day and reversibly during the night, when the box becomes a "lamp" to light the open public spaces around the building. Below we find the auditorium and the storerooms that give support to the exhibition halls above. Through this basement we guarantee good access to the existing museum and to all of the different levels of the public spaces we wish to connect and to guarantee the compatibility of parallel circulations, both public and art related.

Flexibility and Phases

The diagonals provide a circulation system that gives response to two of the main requirements of the brief:
1. The diagonals allow the building to be built in phases according to the brief. In the first phase the basement and two thirds of the building could be built, including the Israeli Wing and Library. The remaining building may then be built in the second phase, locating the remainder of the program with only minor changes to the first. A final phase will place the auditorium and the educational program in the basement.
2. Different parts of the program are given autonomous, vertical circulation schemes within the diagonals. The resulting circulation pattern provides a system in which halls may be opened/closed independent of one another, thus avoiding interference with the rest of the activities of the museum. In this way, the lobby and the diagonals provide autonomy to the restaurant, the auditorium, the education area and the library, with their own control and access areas, guaranteeing the possibility of a wider range of schedules and users independent from those of the exhibition areas.

This flexibility of the management of the program of the building opens its potential to be understood as the support for cultural activities that go beyond exhibiting. The auditorium area, for instance, has been planned to host a variety of activities (both music and speech based) with carefully designed acoustics that can join with the multipurpose area to form a complex that provides an infrastructure size and support not only to the museum but to the whole city of Tel Aviv. Medium, small and big sized events could be hosted according to the different management of the space that our project provides.
All of these possibilities provide constrains that organise the lobby as a buffer between a open public space – a public walkway in front of the Ariela House Library, Hall of Performing Arts Complex, Square, public garden on top of Cameri Theater's Parking lot and Berkovitch street – and a more private one – exhibition halls and the existing museum. This new collective space will allow optimising the management of the building – from the rental of the auditorium and multipurpose hall to external events, to public museum events like temporary activities – and responds to all the urban links requested by the brief and the site.

The new building: revisiting techniques

To achieve the spatial qualities required by the project of the new building for the Tel Aviv Museum of Art, we will attempt to optimise local techniques and resources. Exposed structure throughout the building will allow freeing maximum of the interior spaces within the permitted height of the building. Prefabricated concrete structures will guarantee a high quality of finish, while continuous in situ structures for the roof will ensure waterproofing. Services for all spaces will be provided from within the diagonals, avoiding suspended ceilings and technical floors and thus allowing for maximised floor heights. To optimise energy consumption, air conditioning will be transmitted through the lower parts of the walls, thus cooling only the necessary volume of air within the halls – a technique used in the more recently built museums around the world, such as Tate Modern.
We propose dark green terrazzo, a well-known local technique and material, for the facade. This achieves a stone continuity that protects the building interiors from the sun while integrating the building into its surroundings. The terrazzo allows a flexibility of geometry responding perfectly to the needs of the project and resulting in an extremely elegant and sophisticated finish, representative of the character that the new Tel Aviv Museum of Art should achieve. "

 

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Tel Aviv, Jaffa

Client: Tel Aviv Museum
Location: Tel Aviv, Jaffa
Area: 20.000 Sq.m.
Year: 2003
 

We see this project as an opportunity to act as catalyst to enhance the cultural complex where the new building for the Museum of Tel Aviv will be located. We recognise the value of the museum not just as an exhibition/presentation area, but rather an infrastructure to support the production and transmission of knowledge, and to maintain culture and education as ongoing, dialogical activities.

To allow this and to satisfy the brief's requirements concerning phases and areas, the building is organised through a vertical sedimentation of programs and structures.

The exhibition areas form a roof over a collective space – the lobby – articulating the three existing open spaces surrounding it – giving access to the existing Museum, the Opera square and the elevated garden – while the auditorium, storage and part of the educational program, support and configure

the basement for the whole complex. The more public components of the educational program become portions of this collective space and begin a gradual transition from the public spaces, through the education, to the exhibition areas. We propose a floating box that hosts all of the upper programs – a machine to control the entry of light is formed by several devices that carry out different roles along it's distribution. The first device is a skin composed of strips, reacting to the different programs and when necessary, transmitting light and views to various parts of the building. A second main device is the roof that lights the upper hall galleries from above (with Northern light), altered according to the need of the different exhibitions. A third element is a series of diagonals: the entire upper part of the building is supported by a structure that consists of a series of vierandel – like beams. These free the exhibition halls of columns and host all the circulation and light entrances (with continuous views towards the public park to the West and to the existing Museum Square to East). They span over the collective space with minimal supports.

The diagonal layout of the structure allows us to optimise the spaces negotiating the external triangular shape of the plot with the internal requirements of the exhibition halls. These diagonals concentrate all of the programs that support the exhibition areas and the library, and have the characteristic of being mainly translucent. They allow a controlled transparency from inside during the day and reversibly during the night, when the box becomes a "lamp" to light the open public spaces around the building. Below we find the auditorium and the storerooms that give support to the exhibition halls above. Through this basement we guarantee good access to the existing museum and to all of the different levels of the public spaces we wish to connect and to guarantee the compatibility of parallel circulations, both public and art related.

Flexibility and Phases

The diagonals provide a circulation system that gives response to two of the main requirements of the brief:
1. The diagonals allow the building to be built in phases according to the brief. In the first phase the basement and two thirds of the building could be built, including the Israeli Wing and Library. The remaining building may then be built in the second phase, locating the remainder of the program with only minor changes to the first. A final phase will place the auditorium and the educational program in the basement.
2. Different parts of the program are given autonomous, vertical circulation schemes within the diagonals. The resulting circulation pattern provides a system in which halls may be opened/closed independent of one another, thus avoiding interference with the rest of the activities of the museum. In this way, the lobby and the diagonals provide autonomy to the restaurant, the auditorium, the education area and the library, with their own control and access areas, guaranteeing the possibility of a wider range of schedules and users independent from those of the exhibition areas.

This flexibility of the management of the program of the building opens its potential to be understood as the support for cultural activities that go beyond exhibiting. The auditorium area, for instance, has been planned to host a variety of activities (both music and speech based) with carefully designed acoustics that can join with the multipurpose area to form a complex that provides an infrastructure size and support not only to the museum but to the whole city of Tel Aviv. Medium, small and big sized events could be hosted according to the different management of the space that our project provides.
All of these possibilities provide constrains that organise the lobby as a buffer between a open public space – a public walkway in front of the Ariela House Library, Hall of Performing Arts Complex, Square, public garden on top of Cameri Theater's Parking lot and Berkovitch street – and a more private one – exhibition halls and the existing museum. This new collective space will allow optimising the management of the building – from the rental of the auditorium and multipurpose hall to external events, to public museum events like temporary activities – and responds to all the urban links requested by the brief and the site.

The new building: revisiting techniques

To achieve the spatial qualities required by the project of the new building for the Tel Aviv Museum of Art, we will attempt to optimise local techniques and resources. Exposed structure throughout the building will allow freeing maximum of the interior spaces within the permitted height of the building. Prefabricated concrete structures will guarantee a high quality of finish, while continuous in situ structures for the roof will ensure waterproofing. Services for all spaces will be provided from within the diagonals, avoiding suspended ceilings and technical floors and thus allowing for maximised floor heights. To optimise energy consumption, air conditioning will be transmitted through the lower parts of the walls, thus cooling only the necessary volume of air within the halls – a technique used in the more recently built museums around the world, such as Tate Modern.
We propose dark green terrazzo, a well-known local technique and material, for the facade. This achieves a stone continuity that protects the building interiors from the sun while integrating the building into its surroundings. The terrazzo allows a flexibility of geometry responding perfectly to the needs of the project and resulting in an extremely elegant and sophisticated finish, representative of the character that the new Tel Aviv Museum of Art should achieve. "