Gutman Assif Architects

Guggenheim Museum

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Guggenheim Museum

1.00

Helsinki

Client: Guggenheim Foundation
Location: Helsinki
Area: 20.000 Sq.m.
Year: 2014


Collaboration with Sio2, Barcelona, Spain
Our proposal for the new Guggenheim Helsinki unfolds according to a double agenda;The Museum as a cultural bridge.

 

Urban proposal

The Guggenheim Helsinki Museum creates a new waterfront to the city, which connects the existing green zones; revitalizing the urban area providing access and qualifying the new urban front. It allows these actions through a carefully designed siting strategy.
The building displays its mass constructing a new urban link between the city and the waterfront. On the East side, the visitors are being transported to the entry of the museum and links the new planned green zone which will be located north from the site up to the Esplanadi through the new public zones with the T.htitornin vuori Park. These connections will occur through the roof of the building that extends itself as a pedestrian bridge to the T.htitornin Vuori Park. The new connection will revitalize the cultural center, linking and improving the access. The new Guggenheim will also become the link between other of the city Art Icons, the existing Design Museum and the Museum of Finnish Architecture. On the West side, the vehicular to the port and the museum access is resolved at the dock level, which in result reinforces the pedestrian and bike lanes along Laivasillankatu, by crossing underneath the new pedestrian bridge. This new bridge lands at the same height than the new pedestrian deck around the Olympia Terminal, which will reinforce the pedestrian network towards the seafront.

 

The Museum as an organic institution

Architecturally, our proposal develops a building that explores the possibility of wood construction. This exploration focuses in its structural possibilities, energetic performance and expressive values. The Museum divides its program in three volumes reclaiming references of landed boat structures and traditional wood structures. That display of the mass integrates the museum as a new urban landscape that contributes with a strong formal identity to the overall urban port scape and that does it by recalling recalls the local tradition of integrating nature and architecture. The use of local wood helps to reduce the impact of the carbon footprint of the building construction and maintenance: the use of skylights and outdoor spaces will optimize the use of Northern natural light by reducing the energy consumption and increasing the quality of the spaces. The resulting volumes of this careful calibration organize the program as follows. Two main wings collect the exhibition space and a third one hosts public programs and resolves the logistics of the Museum while provides a connection – pedestrian bridge – with T.htitornin vuori Park. We located the multipurpose zone that operates as a lobby that articulates the different programs where the volumes merge. This organization allows the use of the Museum beyond the regular hours being very flexible for outdoor activities and to open parts of it while keeping the rest of the exhibition areas secure. This flexibility is thought to support the new Guggenheim to become an organic institution in Helsinki that builds a civic and cultural activity around it. "

 

Add To Cart

Helsinki

Client: Guggenheim Foundation
Location: Helsinki
Area: 20.000 Sq.m.
Year: 2014


Collaboration with Sio2, Barcelona, Spain
Our proposal for the new Guggenheim Helsinki unfolds according to a double agenda;The Museum as a cultural bridge.

 

Urban proposal

The Guggenheim Helsinki Museum creates a new waterfront to the city, which connects the existing green zones; revitalizing the urban area providing access and qualifying the new urban front. It allows these actions through a carefully designed siting strategy.
The building displays its mass constructing a new urban link between the city and the waterfront. On the East side, the visitors are being transported to the entry of the museum and links the new planned green zone which will be located north from the site up to the Esplanadi through the new public zones with the T.htitornin vuori Park. These connections will occur through the roof of the building that extends itself as a pedestrian bridge to the T.htitornin Vuori Park. The new connection will revitalize the cultural center, linking and improving the access. The new Guggenheim will also become the link between other of the city Art Icons, the existing Design Museum and the Museum of Finnish Architecture. On the West side, the vehicular to the port and the museum access is resolved at the dock level, which in result reinforces the pedestrian and bike lanes along Laivasillankatu, by crossing underneath the new pedestrian bridge. This new bridge lands at the same height than the new pedestrian deck around the Olympia Terminal, which will reinforce the pedestrian network towards the seafront.

 

The Museum as an organic institution

Architecturally, our proposal develops a building that explores the possibility of wood construction. This exploration focuses in its structural possibilities, energetic performance and expressive values. The Museum divides its program in three volumes reclaiming references of landed boat structures and traditional wood structures. That display of the mass integrates the museum as a new urban landscape that contributes with a strong formal identity to the overall urban port scape and that does it by recalling recalls the local tradition of integrating nature and architecture. The use of local wood helps to reduce the impact of the carbon footprint of the building construction and maintenance: the use of skylights and outdoor spaces will optimize the use of Northern natural light by reducing the energy consumption and increasing the quality of the spaces. The resulting volumes of this careful calibration organize the program as follows. Two main wings collect the exhibition space and a third one hosts public programs and resolves the logistics of the Museum while provides a connection – pedestrian bridge – with T.htitornin vuori Park. We located the multipurpose zone that operates as a lobby that articulates the different programs where the volumes merge. This organization allows the use of the Museum beyond the regular hours being very flexible for outdoor activities and to open parts of it while keeping the rest of the exhibition areas secure. This flexibility is thought to support the new Guggenheim to become an organic institution in Helsinki that builds a civic and cultural activity around it. "